Karwa Chauth: Here's why women look at the moon through a Sieve

DN Bureau

Karwa Chauth is considered to be one of the most traditions of married Hindu women, who observe fast from sunrise to moonrise for long life of their spouse.

Representational Image
Representational Image

New Delhi: Karwa Chauth is considered to be one of the most traditions of married Hindu women, who observe fast from sunrise to moonrise for long life, prosperity and well-being of their spouse. The day starts early before dawn with prayers and a light meal, offered by the mother-in-law in the form of Sargi.

On this day, married women worship the moon and offer prayers to Lord Shiva, Goddess Parvati and Lord Ganesha. Women break their fast after seeing moon through a sieve. As we have seen the rituals in several bollywood movies and songs. But do you know why they women look at the moon through a strainner. 

Also Read: This Karva Chauth, step out in your best look

There are two things about looking at the moon through a sieve. It is said that in North India, the moon of Karwa Chauth is a form of Lord Shiva and his son Lord Ganesha. It is also popular tradition in North for women to wear a ghoongat whenever they are in front of elderly people as a mark of respect. So when the women look at the moon on the Karwa Chauth day, they use the sieve to cover their face to pay their respects.

Secondly, When women worship the moon, they also seek his blessings. The sieve helps in filtering out only the good blessings. The filtered blessings signify happiness and goodwill in life. So while paying their respects, women always use a sieve. (With Agency inputs)

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